WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE CAREGIVER NEEDS CARE?

Ralph and I are about to enter new territory, at least temporarily.  And for me at least it will be a new kind of balancing act, mental and physical.

Next week, exactly two years to the day since moving here and one year since I began a cycle of accelerating pain in my left leg and backside, I am getting a hip replacement.  

The good news is that hip surgery is usually very successful and I am thrilled that there is a solution to stop the pain and give me back most of my old mobility. 

But every time the doctors describe what I will not be able to do during the recovery, I wonder how Ralph will fit into the picture. I will be the one heavily dependent on others for around two weeks and then have limited mobility for awhile—i.e. no bending more than 90 degrees, limited household chores, etc., depending on how quickly my body recovers. At that point I should be able to manage my own needs fine, with a little help, but will I have the energy to manage Ralph’s too? And I certainly can’t count on him for help. 

Arranging my own immediate care has been easy. My son came last weekend to prepare the house, putting a TV in the bedroom for me, cleaning my car and moving furniture. My daughter, a nurse practitioner, is taking a week off to stay with me. When she goes back to work, my son will come back until my post-op check up. Reorganiing after-school care for my grandkids—I usually pick them up every day and keep them until their parents get off work—was not my problem but has been taken care of, fingers crossed.

As for Ralph, we are entering uncharted territory. He is clearly nervous, when he remembers the surgery is coming. Typically, his biggest concern is whether he might have the same problem. He also says he will do whatever I ask him to help. I have already taught him many times, each time it is the first, how to load the dishwasher and feed the dog. Actually the dog, who is learning to sleep in Rick’s office instead of the downstairs bedroom with Ralph, where I have re-installed myself to avoid stairs, has adjusted very well.

Ralph’s adjustment may be trickier. He functions best when he can stick to his routine of eat-read-nap.   I am worried that after the first weeks, once I am back on my own yet not back to full strength, I won’t have the patience to keep that simple routine running smoothly. Intellectually I know the details will work themselves—his pills, his beers, the laundry, unloading the groceries, defrosting the stews and casseroles I have pre-frozen—but I have been obsessing because there is something deeper bothering me.

It showed up last week when I had two scares. One was over my blood pressure, which was worrisomely high when I was checked at a pre-op appointment. When I checked it again the following day the numbers were even higher, dangerously high, so high I was advised to take an extra dose of my blood pressure medicine and then when it stayed up high to go to an emergency room. Which I did, driving myself after telling Ralph I was just going to a doctor’s appointment. He barely looked up from his book. Fortunately the numbers dropped and I was home to make dinner. And the numbers have continued to drop so my surgery is still on. 

One probably reason for the high numbers was an attack of high anxiety over the second scare: I was told that my surgery date was going to be changed causing all the plans I’d put into place to be scratched and leaving me alone with Rick and barely able to for five days. Fortunately my surgeon stepped in and said my family situation made schedule changes impossible.  But for a while there, I was petrified. Even writing about the possibility gets my pulse rising. 

The reality is that caregiver spouses have very little leeway. I want to relax into my recovery, and I will try—have books and movies at the ready—but part of me will be worrying about Ralph as much as I’m worrying about myself.

PS. As I wrote this I remembered that a less than a year after Ralph’s initial diagnosis I fractured my right ankle on black ice. Ralph was still driving then and actually drove an hour on his own to meet me in the emergency room. He drove me back to the hospital for surgery on the ankle weeks later and was a huge help in general during my five months off my leg. His reaction and behavior were in sharp contrast to his unhelpfulness, born out of fear and discomfort, when I had a mastectomy ten years earlier. Ironically, MC/Alzheimer’s has made Ralph a person who wants to help but has also ended up robbing him of that ability.

10 thoughts on “WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE CAREGIVER NEEDS CARE?

  1. I’ll no doubt be going into the hospital before long to have a defibrillator installed in my heart. I don’t have any close family here to take over so this will be something I have to work out. I’ve put it off for several months, but my shortness of breath is pushing me to get it done. Keeping my fingers crossed that I can get things arranged. Take care and good luck with your surgery. You are blessed to have children who are trained in the medical field. Kudos to them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I understand the putting off. I kept pretending to myself that I didn’t have a serious problem. Definitely arrange care, which I know can be tricky. I am lucky to have family support but know that sooner or later I’m going to have to hire care help too. Thanks for writing.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I follow your blog and tremendously appreciate your words. I do not usually comment but I wanted to wish you a very successful surgery and a full recovery. My thoughts and prayers will be with in the coming weeks.
    Thank you for sharing your journey as a caregiver.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Definitely a lot to think about – and worry about! Maybe you could look into/ interview some home health or companion-type persons from a local agency, to have an option to call on should you feel the need. (If one or another of your carefully arranged support people can’t contribute as expected). Wishing you a well-rested surgeon and speedy recovery!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Actually, as soon as I read your note I realized I should have done that but now it is too late (surgery is day after tomorrow). I think we’ll be fine but fingers crossed. And next time I will prepare ahead better. The upside is that perhaps Ralph’s new routine that includes helping out a little will last….thanks for writing.

      Liked by 1 person

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